What If I Make a Mistake?

When you make as many quilts as I do, there are bound to be mistakes. Some mistakes are little, some not so little.

Little mistakes are the ones that are easy to fix. They are the ones that require a little unsewing and restitching and all is well.

Bigger mistakes aren’t that simple.

This past week, I made a big mistake. I was making multiple units like this but not in the traditional way.

right What If I Make a Mistake?

This is what I was supposed to be making.

I wasn’t cutting half-square triangles and a square. I was sewing rectangles and squares together and then cutting to get the triangles.  We’ll explain the technique in the Easy Lesson in the August/September 2016 issue of Quilters Newsletter. I’ll show you the completed quilt later but for now I’ll just tell you I needed 81 of this unit with the 2 small triangles, 1 large triangle and a square.

I usually sew assembly-line style. I cut all the patches needed for a quilt and stack them in piles. I sew all the A patches to the B patches for the whole quilt, then I add all of the C patches for the whole quilt, etc. Somehow that works better for me than doing just a few blocks at a time. So I sewed and cut many of the units I needed for my quilt top, 56 of the 81 units to be exact. Then I went to the ironing board to press and found that 20 of those 56 units were wrong, and not just a little wrong. I’d cut on the diagonal through the square instead of the rectangle so now I had a unit with 3 different sizes of triangles and a rectangle with the point cut off.  Twenty of those strange looking things … 20!

wrong What If I Make a Mistake?

I made 20 of these.

After a few minutes of being disgusted at myself for not noticing my mistake until the pressing stage when it was too late to change anything, I started thinking about how to fix my mistake.

I thought about using the strange blocks on the front of the quilt and tried a few on the design wall but that really changed the overall look of the quilt. The mix of the units sewn correctly and the units sewn incorrectly just didn’t look good to me.

I decided to make a new design on the back of the quilt. So here are those strange little units in a chevron design.

strip What If I Make a Mistake?

This is my fix for the mistake.

It’s not awful. I don’t hate it. In fact, I think it is a good beginning for a quilt back.

And here’s a part that makes me smile. I can imagine someone years and years from now saying, “I’ve never seen this block before. It’s very unusual.” Do you think they’ll be enough of a detective and look at it long enough to see that it’s not an inventive new block but rather an old block that I made wrong?

As a quick aside, I was looking at the QNNtv website, at videos under the Quilters Newsletter TV, The Quilter’s Community heading and remembered some of the really good things we have there. We talk about machine quilting and hand quilting, techniques for traditional quilters and art quilters, just about anything you’d like to learn. Check it out.

Or if you’d like to brush up on the basics, check out the My First Quilt videos with my friend Sara Gallegos.

And remember, for Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest,  Instagram, YouTube,  QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see more Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

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Scrap Bag: “Outlander” fabric coming soon, Nazi flag quilt, Great Migration quilt, and more

Also in this week’s Scrap Bag of quilt and textile news items is a story about inmates who quilt for charity, a round-up of modern quilts for modern homes, an “urban” quilter receives recognition, and broken ceramics repaired with metallic thread.

IMG 2419 Scrap Bag: Outlander fabric coming soon, Nazi flag quilt, Great Migration quilt, and more

The recent Grand Rivers Spring Festival and Quilt Show in Kentucky included a potentially controversial quilt on display, one that was made from a Nazi flag captured by a G.I. in World War II and sent home to his mother. The quilt — which sports a large, prominent swastika — has been mostly kept in storage by the Tidwell family all these years, but they were persuaded to display it by Grand Rivers Mayor Tom Moodie. Click the link below to watch a local news segment about it.
www.wpsdlocal6.com

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Quilt artist Dorothy Straughter recently debuted an appliqued story quilt inspired by and addressing African American history at a Chicago-area quilt shop. The quilt, the second in a planned series of six, depicts scenes associated with the 20th-Century Great Migration of African Americans from the South to the North and Midwest. Images range from the devastation of lynching to the creation of jazz.
www.dnainfo.com

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A select group of female inmates at the Laramie County Detention Center in Wyoming are receiving attention for quilts they’ve been making under the guidance of Sue Frerich. “As she surveyed her students’ work, Frerich noted many of the women who take part in the program begin with little experience, but demonstrate great potential that comes out as they build their skills.”
trib.com/news

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DIY home decor blog Apartment Therapy spotlighted “Our Favorite Modern Quilts” in January, and included commercially available quilts by Louise Grey as well as a number of Etsy finds.
www.apartmenttherapy.com

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Following their success with licensed fabric collections based on “Downton Abbey” and “Little House on the Prairie,” Andover Fabrics has announced it will produce a collection based on the “Outlander” books and TV series. They will be offering a preview of the fabrics at Spring Quilt Market in May and the collection itself should be available in the fall. I’m going to go out on a limb here and predict that there will be tartan prints included, although considering the second book and TV season are set in France, I’m sure the full collection will be as varied and beautiful as the Downton Abbey collection.
www.threeifbyspace.net

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Quilt artist Ben Venom, known for his use of heavy metal t-shirts and motifs, was included in a Huffington Post list of 13 emerging urban artists taken from the book Make Your Mark: The New Urban Artists by Tristan Manco.
www.huffingtonpost.com

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The Japanese art of kintsugi, in which broken ceramics are mended with gold lacquer to draw attention to the cracks rather than obscure them, is taken to a new level by artist Charlotte Bailey. First she wraps the ceramic shards with fabric then hand stitches them back together with gold metallic thread, resulting in gorgeous mixed-media works of art.
www.thisiscolossal.com

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Would you like to get published in a national quilting magazine? Perhaps in Quilters Newsletter? Then do I have news for you!

Our regular “300 Words About Quilting” in each issue of QN, in which we publish four short essays by quilters on a given topic, is one of our most popular, and the next deadline to submit is May 1. The topic is “The Worst Thing Quilting Has Done for Me” and we want to hear your personal reactions and reflections on a subject that could be funny or possibly sobering for some. Regardless of what terrible repercussions you’ve suffered because of your quilting habit, we hope you’ll share them with us. (Pssst — since May 1 is a Sunday and we won’t in the office, I’m thinking we’ll be taking submissions until Monday, May 2.)

Click here to learn how to submit an essay for 300 Words About Quilting and to learn about upcoming topics (note that authors whose essays are included in the print edition receive an honorarium). We can’t wait to read your stories!

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AmericaQuilts Scrap Bag: Outlander fabric coming soon, Nazi flag quilt, Great Migration quilt, and more

America Quilts EXPO is coming to the Iowa Events Center (Hy-Vee Hall) May 26, 27 & 28, 2016. It promises to be not only an event you’ll thoroughly enjoy, but one you’ll remember forever. In addition to Marianne Fons, who will be there all three days, you’ll have a chance to meet Alex Anderson, Eleanor Burns and Mary Fons. Several of the special events and a portion of the admission fee are earmarked to support the mission of the Quilts of Valor® Foundation, making your time at the EXPO the best of both worlds: the fun of a large quilt event, with the feel-good that comes from contributing to a worthwhile cause. Click here to learn all about the America Quilts EXPO.

As always, to find out about Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see  Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on  Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

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So Many Books, Part 19!

PLEASE NOTE, THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED. CONGRATULATIONS CAROLYN, HEMIOLE, PAT, and MELODY!

Here at Quilters Newsletter, we really like to hear from you, the reader. We like to hear what you thought of our issues (please send comments and/or questions to QNMquestions@fwcommunity.com), we like to see what projects you’re working on and/or recently finished (please send submissions for our Quilting Bee feature to QNMsubmissions@fwcommunity.com), and we like to read your essays for our 300 Words on Quilting feature. Our currently requested topic for 300 Words is “The Worst Thing Quilting Has Done for Me.” If you’d like to write an essay for us on this or any of our upcoming topics, make it approximately 300 Words in length and send it (along with your contact information) to QNMsubmissions@fwcommunity.com. Your essay can be funny, sad, satirical, poignant, joyous, or contain any other emotion. We print four 300 Words submissions for the topic in each issue and post more in our Web Extra feature for each issue on our website. Our April/May 2016 issue had lots of essays to share.

Part 19 Prizes 1 2 So Many Books, Part 19!We also like to give away prizes. This week’s prizes 1 & 2 are identical and include The New Hexagon by Katja Marek for That Patchwork Place, Recycled Hexie Quilts by Mary Kerr for Schiffer Publishing, Patchwork Loves Embroidery by Gail Pan for That Patchwork Place, and Quilting with Doilies by Barbara Polston for Schiffer Publishing.

Part 19 Prizes 3 4 So Many Books, Part 19!Prizes 3 & 4 are also identical and include Fast and Fun Baby Quilts by Martingale, Fast Fat-Quarter Quilts by Martingale, Fun-Size Quilts compiled by Karen M. Burns for That Patchwork Place, and Alphabet Zoo by Vicki Hansen for Kansas City Star Quilts.

To enter for your chance to win one of these three sets of books, leave a comment on this post by 11:59 pm Mountain Time, Sunday, May 1, 2016, telling us about the smallest quilting project you’ve ever made. If you have a preference between the prizes, let us know that in your comment as well. Since winners are randomly selected, we don’t guarantee you’ll win your preferred prize if chosen, but we’ll do our best! Open to anyone worldwide who has not won anything from Quilters Newsletter in the past 90 days. If you are randomly selected as a winner, the email will come from QNMquestions@fwmedia.com with “Quilters Newsletter blog giveaway” in the subject line.

To find out about more giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and to see all the beautiful quilts we like to share, join us on FacebookTwitter, Google+, Pinterest, InstagramYouTube and our website. Plus, see quilting tutorial videos and shows on QNNtv.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Caitlin, Contests | Tagged , , , , , , | 43 Comments

Working with Large-Scale Prints

101 4113revised Working with Large Scale Prints

The Nearly Done Quilt

I want to talk just one more time about this pretty quilt. I’ve told you about several things along the way but I didn’t mention any of the specifics about working with the big floral prints in this pretty line of fabric. The collection is Retro Florals by Michael Miller fabrics. The corner blocks finish at 13½”. The appliqued parts of the corner blocks (my granddaughter calls them “the lily pads”) are about 9”. The rose that I used for the broiderie perse on the center Dresden plate measures about 3¼” across.

QNMP 150900 SP FAB MICH 49000 Working with Large Scale Prints

I used this large-scale print in a different colorway.

Here’s a photo of that fabric. I’ve left the selvedge in the photo to help you tell the size.

I’ve found I’m more successful when I select the large-scale print first, then plan the quilt and then actually purchase the fabric. I have actually stood in the fabric store and counted motifs in order to be sure I had the number of motifs I needed. In the case of the quilt top above, I had a limited amount of fabric and had to piece the applique in the upper right hand corner. I matched the print carefully but you can still see the splice. It would have been better if I’d designed the quilt and then purchased whatever amount I needed to have 4 complete motifs for the corner block. But I had just a set of fat quarters so I made it work.

So just a general run-through of the things I think you might like to know about sewing large scale prints.

1. Plan, plan, plan. Think about where you can show off the print to the best advantage. Then let it be the star.

2. Simple blocks are fine when working with large-scale prints. Generally, the block size needs to be generous.

3. In order to get the part of the motif where you want it, you’ll need to fussy-cut the fabric. You frequently use more fabric than the pattern calls for when using a large-scale print but the results are so worth the effort.

4. I like to pair large-scale prints with solids, geometric prints and very small prints. Again, that lets the large-scale print be the star.

Mostly, just have fun. Don’t be afraid to try.

How about it? Do those of you with experience working with large-scale prints have any other thoughts to share?

If you’d like to give it a try, I found several pretty prints at Keepsake Quilting.

Remember for Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest,  Instagram, YouTube,  QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see more Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Inspiration, Lori Baker, Staff Quilts | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Scrap Bag: a quilting angel, machine applique called “cheating,” cinematic color inspiration, and more

This week’s Scrap Bag has even more news and tidbits: two statewide documentation projects, quilting as outreach among a Canadian First Nation community, how the maker of a 19th-century quilt was identified by a team of researchers, quilting metaphors in the latest from one of America’s leading playwrights, and an exciting discovery of a centuries-old shipwreck that yielded a silk dress in relatively good shape all things considered (includes bonus video in Dutch!).

IMG 2420 Scrap Bag: a quilting angel, machine applique called cheating, cinematic color inspiration, and more

 

Do you need to have your faith in humanity bolstered or restored? Then you need to read this story about “Granny” Buckner, an angel among us if such a thing is possible. In addition to running a sewing shop in St. Paul, Minnesota, where she offers free quilting classes to young people in her neighborhood, Buckner fostered hundreds of kids over the course of the last few decades in addition to raising her own eight children and serving as a preacher in the family church. Seriously, you need to read this story.
www.twincities.com

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How do quilt historians determine the origin of antique quilts when all they have to go on is scraps of information? A 19th-century hexagon quilt was an artifact in the Gregg-Graniteville Archives in South Carolina, but its origins had been lost to history. It took a team effort by librarians, archeologists, textile curators and quilt historians to determine an attribution of which they feel confident.
www.aikenstandard.com

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Here’s a source for general design inspiration that may appeal most to film buffs. Director Wes Anderson (“The Royal Tenenbaums,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”) is known for the very specific art direction of his films, giving them a unique look that in turn informs the story. In particular he is known for framing very symmetrical scenes, the types of which rarely if ever exist in real life, and for stylized color palettes that tie together costume and decor. The point being, this Tumblr has a number of color palettes taken from Anderson films that might be helpful if you’re searching for color combinations.
wesandersonpalettes.tumblr.com

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Eight women have just completed their first bargello quilts as part of a new workshop offered through the Pulaarvik Kablu Friendship Centre in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, Canada. The quilting workshop was designed to offer women in the Kivalliq community a space to talk about their relationships, an outgrowth of a program that hosts sessions on healthy relationship building and anger management in Rankin Inlet’s schools and its local healing facility.
www.nunatsiaqonline.ca

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What constitutes “cheating” when it comes to quilting? As the Quilt Scout, Mary Fons addresses the persistent notion held by some quilters that to use a machine, specifically for applique, is Against The Rules.
www.quilts.com

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The West Virginia Quilt Documentation Project is holding a series of documentation days, beginning in April in Huntington and continuing in June at the West Virginia Quilt Festival in Summersville.
wvquilters.org

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The Delaware Quilt Documentation Project will host a Quilt Documentation Day April 30 at the Lewes Presbyterian Church. Owners of quilts made before 1950 are encouraged to bring their quilts to this documentation process; appointments are recommended.
www.sussexcountian.com

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Mary Page Marlowe, the latest work by playwright Tracy Letts (August: Osage County), just opened at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre. In it, one character is played by six different actresses over the course of her life. This review in the Journal Sentinel digs a bit into the quilt metaphors in the play, from its non-linear structure to an antique quilt described by the the oldest Mary Page that she’d forgotten she owned.
www.jsonline.com

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A group of Dutch divers recently found a 17th-century chest containing a surprisingly well-preserved collection of clothing, books and other items that may have once belonged to an English noblewoman buried in a shipwreck under the Wadden Sea off the coast of the Netherlands. “Of all the items recovered from the wreck, perhaps one of the most fascinating is the silk dress, which was in remarkably good shape after centuries buried underwater. While the dress is made of fine textiles, conservators say it was likely made for a noblewoman’s everyday use because it lacks fancy embroidery and decorative beads.” Click the link to see photos; the video below doesn’t have English subtitles* but shows close-ups of the items.
www.smithsonianmag.com

*Based on the music, though, it seems this is being presented as a rather dramatic find.

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NorthValleyStars 800 298x300 Scrap Bag: a quilting angel, machine applique called cheating, cinematic color inspiration, and more

North Valley Stars, designed by made by Barbara Eikmeier, quilted by Theresa Ward, is included in the April/May 2016 issue of Quilters Newsletter.

North Valley Stars by Barbara Eikmeier is one of the prettiest quilts I’ve had the pleasure of hanging on my cubicle wall to write the pattern for, and I’ve patterned a lot of pretty quilts. I love how Barb’s setting of basic blocks — Ohio star, swamp angel, 54-40 or fight — and her fabric placement in a monochromatic palette creates the illusion of curving lines and a diagonal setting without requiring either technique. This traditional pattern is rated intermediate and will keep you busy for a while, especially if you give it the heirloom-quality quilting it deserves, but the results will be well worth your time and effort.

You can find the full pattern for North Valley Stars in the April/May 2016 issue of QN; it’s also available individually as a digital download. A kit containing fabric for the quilt top and binding is available, as is thebacking fabric, from quiltandsewshop.com.

As always, to find out about Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see  Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on  Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Mary Kate Karr-Petras | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Just Trippin’ and Cotton Solids

PLEASE NOTE, THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED. CONGRATULATIONS ANNA and JOANNE!

Quilters Newsletter‘s April/May 2016 issue has a lot of wonderful quilting ideas inside, QNAM16Cover 200 Just Trippin and Cotton Solids including quilts inspired by armed forces service ribbons, the winning quilts from our Be Creative! Quilt Challenge, lessons on cutwork and bias strips, and other interesting quilts and patterns. It also has the start of a new series quilt which promises to help build some quilting skills along the way. In the Staff Picks section, there are four new quilting books, four new quilting products, and four new quilting fabric collections. This week’s giveaway includes two of those collections:

Prize 1 is a bundle of Just Trippin’ by Studio 8 for Quilting Treasures: QuiltingTreasures JustTrippin Just Trippin and Cotton Solids

Prize 2 is a bundle of Cotton Solids by American Made Brand: AmericanMadeBrand CottonSolids Just Trippin and Cotton Solids

For inspiration on what you could make with Just Trippin’, here’s a block we made for Staff Picks to show off this collection in Quilters Newsletter April/May 2016Block 4 Just Trippin and Cotton Solids

For inspiration on what you could make with Cotton Solids, here’s a block we made for Staff Picks to show off this collection in Quilters Newsletter April/May 2016. This block is called Devil’s Claws, and it happens to be the free web extra quilt block pattern for Quilters Newsletter April/May 2016Block 3 Just Trippin and Cotton Solids

To enter for your chance to win one of the two lovely fabric bundles, leave a comment on this post by 11:59 pm Mountain Time, Sunday, April 24, 2016, telling us if you prefer to use solids or tone-on-tone fabrics as blenders in your quilting. If you have a preference between the prizes, let us know that in your comment as well. Since winners are randomly selected, we don’t guarantee you’ll win your preferred prize if chosen, but we’ll do our best! Open to anyone worldwide who has not won anything from Quilters Newsletter in the past 90 days. If you are randomly selected as a winner, the email will come from QNMquestions@fwmedia.com with “Quilters Newsletter blog giveaway” in the subject line.

To find out about more giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and to see all the beautiful quilts we like to share, join us on FacebookTwitter, Google+, Pinterest, InstagramYouTube and our website. Plus, see quilting tutorial videos and shows on QNNtv.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Caitlin, Contests | Tagged , , , | 297 Comments

It Was a Weekend to Hibernate

It was a very snowy (but not cold) weekend. I stayed home and inside the house most of the time. In fact, the only times I left the house were when the dogs needed to go out. But that meant I had lots of time to sew.

I finished a quilt top but I can’t show it to you yet. I’ll tell you more about it later.

But I can show you the pieced back for that quilt that I completed late Sunday afternoon.

04 18 16 backrevised It Was a Weekend to Hibernate

Snowy Day Pieced Back

All of those 1-inch-wide green-and-white and purple-and-white strips are leftovers from the front of the quilt. Most of the large pieces of fabric are from the Tranquility collection by Connecting Threads. I had a fat quarter bundle and used the deep purple fabrics from it for the front of the quilt.

As I was making this quilt back, I placed the green and white strips on my design wall and then started filling in the empty spaces with the big pieces of green and green-and-purple prints from the fat quarter bundle.

I sewed together the first vertical panel on the left to show how long the quilt back needed to be. Then I started at the center sewing pieces together to make big rectangular “chunks” of fabric. As I passed the halfway point, it was obvious that I didn’t have enough fabric.

Back in my fabric inventory, I found another fat quarter bundle, Mosaic Blooms, also from Connecting Threads. The purples in this collection were much lighter, more in the lavender family but they worked well with what I’d already constructed.

In order to make the whole top look like it went together and not like I’d run out of fabric and had to add some at the very end, I cut most of the top off that first panel on the left and added a bit of green and a good-sized piece of one of the new lavender fabrics I’d chosen. I added another of the lavender fabrics from the new collection to the top and bottom of the second vertical panel on the left. Then I added the narrow lavender strip 1/3 of the way down from the top of the center. Now although much of the lavender is on the lower right, it’s balanced by that in the upper right and I think it works.

Now I have to contact my quilter friend and see when she wants to do her magic.

What to do next? I was poking around at QuiltandSewShop.com and found a collection of six star quilt patterns in digital format. I am so tempted.

But for now, I need to look at what I have on my desk. There are several things that need my attention. Remember for Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest,  Instagram, YouTube,  QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see more Web Seminars on QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Inspiration, Lori Baker, Staff Quilts | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Scrap Bag: 20-foot art quilt on permanent display, Be Creative! winner in news, quilting company hires refugees, and more

Just this past week the trees have erupted into bloom here in Denver, which must mean it’s time for a big spring snowstorm. As I type this, the clouds are descending from over the mountains and we are preparing for up to a foot of snow to fall before Monday. Looking on the bright side, that means we’ll have undeniable “quilting weather.” Let’s get in the mood for weekend sewing regardless of the weather with some tidbits from the quilting world!

IMG 2416 Scrap Bag: 20 foot art quilt on permanent display, Be Creative! winner in news, quilting company hires refugees, and more

In 2013 Ann Loveless won the viewers’ choice award at the annual ArtPrize competition in Grand Rapids, Michigan, for her 20-foot-long landscape art quilt Sleeping Bear Dune Lakeshore, which depicts a section of Lake Michigan she’d grown up seeing often. The award came with a $200,000 cash prize. In 2015, Ann and her photographer husband, Steven, collaborated on the creation of Northwood Awakening, a 25-foot-long combination of photograph and textile art that garnered the couple another viewers’ choice award and another $200,000. (You can read more about both pieces in an article I wrote for the March/April 2016 issue of McCall’s Quilting). Sleeping Bear Dune Lakeshore has been permanently installed at the visitor center of its namesake national lakeshore and is being unveiled this month.
www.record-eagle.com

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Here is some eye candy from the My Modern Met blog that demonstrates how showcasing something familiar in a new context can open our eyes to artistic possibilities. Be sure to click through to see the photo galleries.

First up: work by artist Satoru Aoyama, who combines vintage prints and embroidery stitches to create fascinating multi-medium works of art. He uses an old Singer sewing machine to add vibrant embroidery to historical black-and-white photos and art prints of women doing needlework of various types, allowing their handiwork to come alive in the process.
www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/satoru-aoyama-embroidery

London-based artist Rebecca Louise Law has created Garten for the Bikini Berlin shopping mall, an installation made of over 30,000 cut flowers suspended upside down by wires. “The petals dangle just above the heads of patrons who enter the building and will shift subtly in scent, tone, and texture as they dry out over the course of the exhibit, which runs through May 1st, 2016.”
www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/rebecca-louise-law-bikini-berlin-garten-flower-installation

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Stitched, a Salt Lake City-based quilting company founded by designer Emily Taylor, is starting a crowdfunding initiative to train and hire refugees who have been relocated to Utah, in addition to purchasing needed sewing machinery. Taylor “noted that her motivation behind hiring refugees in Utah was threefold. She realized many refugees already had the sewing skills she was looking for and, in conjunction with helping people in need, she also wanted to find a way to keep jobs within the state. … Stitched has already hired its first refugee, a woman from Rwanda who left her home to escape the genocide happening there.”
www.thespectrum.com

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aMAZEingChain 800 Scrap Bag: 20 foot art quilt on permanent display, Be Creative! winner in news, quilting company hires refugees, and more

a-MAZE-ing Chain by Amy Asmus, machine quilted by Diane Matthias

Yet another winner from last year’s Be Creative! Quilt Challenge has been featured in her local newspaper. Amy Asmus won second place for a-MAZE-ing Chain in the contest co-sponsored by Quilters Newsletter, McCall’s Quilting and Quiltmaker. Congrats, Amy!
thebuffalocentertribune.com

(The winners and finalists will be displayed at all Original Sewing & Quilt Expos and the America Quilts Expo in 2016. You can view the top three prize-winning quilts on our website and see all of the finalists in the April/May 2016 issue of QN.)

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“Just a few weeks ago, Nadine Johnson, Lyndell Strong and Wynona Hughes added the last tiny, perfect stitches to finish the quilt stretched on the frame in the corner of the Ozark County Senior Center. The pretty ‘Road to St. Louis’ quilt, hand-pieced by Nadine, is the final quilt to be quilted by the Senior Center quilting group. The frame was taken down and sold. The corner where friends had gathered to quilt and visit for so many years is quiet now.” Don’t worry, the story isn’t all sad. These women have some funny stories to tell and wonderful memories to cherish.
www.ozarkcountytimes.com

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Quilt artist Pam Holland will be hosting the McCall’s Quilting upcoming quilter’s tour of India, and she wrote about a previous trip to India for the McCall’s Editors’ Blog. “Pam is a very experienced traveler, and has much to share with us about our destination and the role of travel in a quilter’s life.”
www.mccallsquilting.com/blogs/

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NorthValleyStars 800 298x300 Scrap Bag: 20 foot art quilt on permanent display, Be Creative! winner in news, quilting company hires refugees, and more

North Valley Stars, designed by made by Barbara Eikmeier, quilted by Theresa Ward, is included in the April/May 2016 issue of Quilters Newsletter.

North Valley Stars by Barbara Eikmeier is one of the prettiest quilts I’ve had the pleasure of hanging on my cubicle wall to write the pattern for, and I’ve patterned a lot of pretty quilts. I love how Barb’s setting of basic blocks — Ohio star, swamp angel, 54-40 or fight — and her fabric placement in a monochromatic palette creates the illusion of curving lines and a diagonal setting without requiring either technique. This traditional pattern is rated intermediate and will keep you busy for a while, especially if you give it the heirloom-quality quilting it deserves, but the results will be well worth your time and effort.

You can find the full pattern for North Valley Stars in the April/May 2016 issue of QN; it’s also available individually as a digital download. A kit containing fabric for the quilt top and binding is available, as is the backing fabric, from quiltandsewshop.com.

As always, to find out about Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see  Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on  Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Mary Kate Karr-Petras | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Making Bias Strips

PLEASE NOTE, THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED. CONGRATULATIONS KATHY!

HungryBugBaltimore 800 297x300 Making Bias Strips

Hungry Bug Baltimore by Suzanne Marshall

There happens to be an Easy Lesson titled “Perfectly Basted Bias Strips” by Suzanne Marshall in Quilters Newsletter April/May 2016. It details tips and tricks for creating beautiful bias strips, particularly for use in hand applique, though you could also use these strips for machine applique. The method taught in the Easy Lesson is one method to create bias strips, but if you prefer to create yours with a little help from some dedicated technology, this week’s giveaway prize, a Simplicity Bias Tape Maker, could help: SimplicityBiasTapeMaker Making Bias StripsTo enter for your chance to win a Simplicity Bias Maker, leave a comment on this post by 11:59 pm Mountain Time, Sunday, April 16, 2016, telling us about the space where you quilt. Open to anyone worldwide who has not won anything from Quilters Newsletter in the past 90 days. If you are randomly selected as a winner, the email will come from QNMquestions@fwmedia.com with “Quilters Newsletter blog giveaway” in the subject line.

To find out about more giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and to see all the beautiful quilts we like to share, join us on FacebookTwitter, Google+, Pinterest, InstagramYouTube and our website. Plus, see quilting tutorial videos and shows on QNNtv.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Caitlin, Contests | Tagged , | 54 Comments

Thank Goodness for Our Differences

We don’t all think alike. There are all kinds of explanations: left brain or right brain, science/math brain or language/art brain, being born under different zodiac signs, being gifted with different talents, and on and on it goes. I can’t explain it at all but I see it in the world around me. One way of thinking isn’t better than the other; they are just different.

For example, this past week in my blog post, I explained that the stripes in my quilt top did not all go the same direction and in order to fix it, I was going to take out the two offending blocks and turn them a quarter turn to make the stripes in the whole quilt top run the same way. I thought I had the problem solved. My brain came up with a fix and I stopped thinking about it.

But a couple of hours later, Mary Kate came to my office and asked to see the “Michael Miller quilt top”. Mary Kate’s brain works differently than mine. She has rescued me a number of times when I don’t see something the way she does so I immediately got my quilt top out and put it up on the wall in my office. She’d been thinking about it and realized that if I simply took out two blocks and rotated them like I planned, I’d mess with the chain that goes across each 9-patch block. Even after she said it, I had to think a minute before I saw what she was saying. The striped fabric was in the same position in each unit and if I rotated the blocks, the striped fabric would no longer create a chain going from the upper left to the lower right corner. In order to totally fix the top to match the image in my head, I’d have to take the blocks out, take them apart and even take the little 4-patch units with the striped fabric apart. I was not willing to do that.

04 04 finish Thank Goodness for Our Differences

Before …

Mary Kate and I talked a while about my options and came up with possible solutions to make the quilt top look symmetrical without taking practically the whole quilt top apart.

I am so grateful for Mary Kate and the fact that her brain works differently than mine. I would have taken the two blocks out, sewn the top back together and then had a pity party because it was still wrong. This way, I took two different blocks out, arranged things on the design wall to be certain it was going to look good and then sewed things back together. I realize the chain is not there anymore but that seems much less noticeable to me than the stripes were.

04 11 16 2 Thank Goodness for Our Differences

and After

This weekend I completed the pieced quilt back. To see how I make pieced quilt backs, check out this video on QNNtv.com.

04 11 16 3 Thank Goodness for Our Differences

The Pieced Back

I have only three pieces of the pretty Michael Miller fabric left. The largest is 1½” x 5”. I used all the rest of the scraps from the front to make the back. As you can see, the layers are basted and I’ve got some of the in-the-ditch quilting done.

While I was waiting for hubby to get the big folding table set up so I could pin baste the layers together, I worked on another project (with a little help from Sketch.)

04 11 16 Thank Goodness for Our Differences

Sketch, the Quilting Cat

Now, until next time, remember for Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest,  Instagram, YouTube,  QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see more Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Lori Baker | 5 Comments