Autumn Spice

PLEASE NOTE, THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED. CONGRATULATIONS ELISABETH!

No matter how many times we check and double-check a pattern, sometimes we make a mistake. More often than not when we get asked if a pattern is correct,DPQN20911 Autumn Spice it actually is (though we always check again anyway). Sometimes it just makes more sense once you’ve made a block than before you’ve made one. When we got an email asking about the border unit assembly in Music of the Seasons from our Best Quilts for Christmas 2011 issue, the E and F patch sizes sounded like they weren’t going to go together the way they should, and it turns out the F patch size asked for is a bit larger than needed.

The block size in Music of the Seasons is 9″ finished, and I had a miscellaneous 9″ block laying around I could turn into a small quilt if I made three more of that block and added the border from Music of the Seasons around them. I’ve always liked that border, and it would be a good way to do some test sewing on the patch sizes. The original pattern is a bed runner, but there’s no reason the same pattern can’t be used to make a different size quilt. Below is what a corner unit and a border unit look like laid out as cut patches. The F half square triangles in the image were cut from 3″ squares, not the 3 1/2″ squares the pattern calls for. If cut from 3 1/2″ squares, they can be trimmed down once sewn. The 90 degree angle corners of the triangles should be matched on the squares when sewn with the 45 degree angle corners hanging off by 1/4″ which can be trimmed off later. The black folded squares are rolled back and appliqued in place after the patches are sewn together to create a ribbon effect.MusicBorderUnits Autumn Spice

Below is one corner unit and three border units sewn together, laid out above the block I’m going to make three more of. If cutting down from the 3 1/2″ square triangles, the points of the squares should have a 1/4″ seam allowance beyond them. The block I’m using happens to be, coincidentally, the same quilt block being made in McCall’s Quilt Along Glorieta Lesson 7 of 12, which aired this week. It looks quite different with the different fabrics!MusicBlockWBorder Autumn Spice

If you’re here on this post for this week’s giveaway, it happens to be a bundle from the Autumn Spice metallic accent collection from P&B Textiles:PB AutumnSpice Autumn Spice

To enter for your chance to win a bundle of Autumn Spice, leave a comment on this post by 11:59 pm Mountain Time, Sunday, October 23, 2016, telling us about a technique you like using in your quilting. Open to anyone worldwide who has not won anything from Quilters Newsletter in the past 90 days. If you are randomly selected as a winner, the email will come from QNMquestions@fwmedia.com with “Quilters Newsletter blog giveaway” in the subject line.

To find out about more giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and to see all the beautiful quilts we like to share, join us on FacebookTwitter, Google+, Pinterest, InstagramYouTube and our website. Plus, see quilting tutorial videos and shows on QNNtv.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

About Caitlin

Caitlin Dickey is the Video Content Strategist for the Quilting Community of F+W, including for Quilters Newsletter Magazine. Reach her or other QN staff at QNMquestions@fwmedia.com.
This entry was posted in Caitlin, Contests and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

83 Responses to Autumn Spice

  1. Peggy Wagner says:

    My favorite technique is appliqué.

  2. Sharon I says:

    I love hand sewing and hand quilting

  3. Patricia Matula says:

    I like to machine quilt my tops. I’m trying free-motion but also use straight line machine guided quilting, especially if the tops are big.

  4. Kate Hutley says:

    I make mistakes a LOT~~my seam ripper is one of my good friends. I like simple stitching with a minimum of cutting.

  5. Camille says:

    I like piecing with half and quarter square triangles in scrappy quilts. They increase the movement and add interest on a quilt top.

  6. Susan K says:

    Chain piecing is one of my favorite techniques. And I do enjoy s challenging paper foundation pieced quilt.

  7. jeannie zimmerman says:

    My Go To technique is HST. Whenever I am stuck selecting a pattern for a group of fabrics, I can always begin with making a pile of HST and the rest falls into place. Also applique is a Go To whenever I discover a section(s) of a quilt top looks ‘vacant,’ I can add a related applique feature in contrasting fabric. This has saved me more than once.

  8. Linda Erickson says:

    I have to admit that I am a big fan of foundation piecing
    thanks

  9. Irene Chandler says:

    I love, love, love curved piecing!

  10. Sheila Fernkopf says:

    I like to chain piece. And I am enjoying doing a small quilt with Y seams. Thank you for the opportunity to win!

  11. Gail Quast says:

    I love to do traditional piecing. I’ve experimented with applique but am not good at it yet.
    I don’t think I’ve ever made a quilt exactly like the pattern. I almost always resize the block or alter the construction. Side benefit – I get to do the math to determine the new cutting sizes. Love doing that.

  12. Susan says:

    I love binding quilts! It’s like planting the flag at the top of the mountain! And I jazz them up – use a stipe cut on the bias, or add piping or a fabric fold, scrap-piece some bindings, etc. It’s another opportunity for a design element!

  13. Denise P says:

    I love it all!! Trying to become proficient on a long arm is my latest challenge. But I really enjoy machine quilting on my domestic machine. So fun to enjoy the finished product. Thank you for your inspiration!!

  14. Gisela Buitendag says:

    I fall in love with yoyos to be sewn on a patched background!
    Thank you for your giveaways.

  15. Leeanna Walker says:

    I like using Noriko Endo’s techniques found in her book Confetti Landscapes.

  16. Maureen says:

    I love foundation piecing and have done quite a lot of it.

  17. I like piecing quilts the best. I am learning to applique and like it also.

  18. Katina Hronas says:

    Fusing and embellishing with “mixed-media” ephemera and trinkets!

  19. monika says:

    I love drawing with FMQ. Kids designs are my fave, fairy gardns r a big hit at the moment.

  20. ANN BRASSELL says:

    Chain piecing helps me save lots of time!

  21. Kathy says:

    I love foundation piecing!

  22. Tim says:

    I like strip piecing, especially for quick projects.

  23. Janie says:

    I like paper piecing.

  24. Kathy E. says:

    One technique that I love is applique. I admit that I need more practice to make it perfect, but even when it turns out a bit wonky, I still like it! There are just so many possibilities with fussy cutting fabric and different shapes and even the stitch to tack it down!

  25. Angie says:

    I love doing appliqué I just started trying it and now I’m hooked

  26. Abbey says:

    I really like using precuts especially using them for half square triangle projects!

  27. Brandi says:

    I really enjoy strip piecing quilts especially for jelly roll races and piano key borders

  28. Aubrey Z says:

    My favorite technique is chain piecing I like how Quickly quilts come together

  29. Sally Stevens says:

    I enjoy the ‘quilt as you go’ technique for making larger quilt projects.

  30. Kathey Quelland says:

    I love these fabrics! And fat quarters.sre perfect for quilt construction these days for me. Thanks so much for this giveaway!

  31. Kathy Luehrs says:

    applique – I love, love, love it

  32. marianne says:

    Applique or something that is very easy.

  33. Elisabeth says:

    The fabric bundle arrived today. It is gorgeous! I’m so excited! Many thanks! Greetings from Austria!

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