Quilters Newsletter wants YOU!

Have you noticed Quilters Newsletter’s tagline up there in the header of our blog? Just scroll up a bit if you need to, I can wait. It says “Art. Craft. Community.” We’re pretty good at sourcing the Art and Craft parts of that mission statement, but we cannot fulfill the Community part without you, our readers.

We are so dedicated to serving the quilting community that we dedicate three regular departments of each issue to what quilters send to us, be it stories, quilt photos or letters to the editor.

And not to toot our own horn — well, maybe a little toot — but there are a number of libraries and quilt museums that keep QN back issues for their archives because of the role we’ve played since 1969 in documenting not just the “what” and “how” of quilting, but also the “who,” “when,” “where” and “why” of quilting. So if we print your letter or photo, you will be entered into the Quilting Record — how cool is that?

Here are the sections of QN that we devote to our readers.

IMG 1949 Quilters Newsletter wants YOU!

300 Words About Quilting from the December/January 2016 issue of Quilters Newsletter

300 Words About Quilting is just what it sounds like: an opportunity for you to write a personal essay or reflection about a given quilting topic in approximately 300 words. We publish four submissions in each print issue, and publish additional wonderful stories on our website.

Our next deadline is January 1, 2016, for the topic “Quilts Inspired by Local Traditions.” In generations past when information moved much more slowly, quilts retained regional qualities, which makes it easier for quilt historians to determine where antique quilts likely were made. But what about now, when national quilt publications and especially the Internet have made it so easy for us all to see each others’ work and learn from each other? Has where you live inspired your quilt choices? Does a sense of place work itself into the quilts you make? Tell us!

And if you want to plan ahead, here are some more upcoming topics and deadlines:

  • March 1, 2016 – The Best Thing Quilting Has Done For Me
  • May 1, 2016 – The Worst Thing Quilting Has Done for Me
  • July 1, 2016 – The Most Unusual Influence on My Quilting

Click here to learn how to submit an essay for 300 Words About Quilting (note that authors whose essays are included in the print edition receive an honorarium). We can’t wait to read your stories!

Quilting Bee is where you show us the quilts you’ve been making, simple as that. Of course, we always love it when you make your own version of a pattern you found in QN, but we don’t limit the photos we publish just to familiar quilts — we love seeing them all. Send all photos (high-resolution) and correspondence to: Quilters Newsletter, 741 Corporate Circle, Suite A, Golden, CO 80401; email: QNMsubmissions@fwmedia.com.

We Hear You is our letters to the editor page on which we also include comments folks leave for us on our blog, Facebook page and Twitter. We appreciate all feedback in regard to our content — what have you really liked? What about anything you didn’t like (we hope there aren’t many letters on that topic but it does happen)? What would you like to see more of? Send correspondence to: Quilters Newsletter, 741 Corporate Circle, Suite A, Golden, CO 80401; email: QNMsubmissions@fwmedia.com.

We hope to hear from you soon!

Posted in Mary Kate Karr-Petras | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quilt exhibits to visit Winter 2015-2016

QN11215 221x300 Quilt exhibits to visit Winter 2015 2016As we head into the final few weeks of autumn and toward the solstice, your thoughts — not to mention the weather — may already be turning to winter. If you’re going to be spending more time indoors, why not do so at an exhibit of quilts?

In the “What’s New” section of every issue of Quilters Newsletter, we spotlight exhibits happening around the U.S. and some in Europe, particularly at different quilt and textile museums. But there’s always more to see than we have room for in print, so here’s a list of additional quilt exhibits you don’t want to miss. For even more, be sure to pick up your copy of Quilters Newsletter’s December/January 2016 issue on sale now in quilt shops, bookstores, on newsstands, and online at QuiltandSewShop.com in both print and digital editions.

**This post is being regularly updated, so check back! Last update: Feb. 10, 2016**

ALASKA

Art Cloth North II February 5-29 at blue.hollomon gallery in Anchorage. The juried exhibition features work from nine artists from the Alaska region of the Studio Art Quilt Associates (SAQA).
www.adn.com

 

ARIZONA

Art Quilts Year XX: Journeys & Life Cycles through January 9 at the Chandler Center for the Arts in Chandler. The exhibit of approximately 80 pieces features textile artworks that relate to self-growth, regeneration or the taking of a new pathway.
www.chandlercenter.org

 

CALIFORNIA

Strata: Studio Art Quilt Associates through December 16 at the Firehouse Arts Center in Pleasanton. This exhibition of 33 artists, juried by SAQA founder Yvonne Porcella, features a variety of textile works by talented quilt artists who are members of the Northern California /Northern Nevada Region of SAQA.
www.firehousearts.org

Cutting Edge through January 31 at the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art. This exhibit is composed of fifteen Central California Coast artists working with cloth and the quilt form to produce contemporary fiber art.
www.sloma.org

Yo-Yos & Half Squares: Contemporary California Quilts through February 21 at the Oakland Museum of California. Highlighting the stunning creations of five quilters from the Oakland-based Eli Leon collection, Yo-Yos & Half Squares: Contemporary California Quilts presents 20 quilts that defy standard expectations, dating from the late 1980s and early 2000s.  Although the quilts are highly distinct from each other, the exhibition reflects the makers’ individual interests, skills and talents and Eli Leon’s vision and unique story as a collector, beginning in the early 1970s and with a large focus on African American quilters.
museumca.org

Made in America: Craft Icons of the 50 States through February 21 at the Mingei International Museum in San Diego. While not devoted exclusively to quilts, this exhibit of folk art and crafts includes quilts as emblematic of a few different states, including a Gee’s Bend quilt from Alabama and Pennsylvania Dutch quilts. ”I don’t think there’s any other craft as iconic as the quilt, not for any one state but for the whole country,” curator Rob Sidner said.
www.mingei.org

 

COLORADO

Conversations:  Significant Years through March 19 at aBuzz Gallery in Denver. For this solo show by friend-of-QN and textile artist Carol Ann Waugh, she ”decided to create a series of pieces that use words and phrases to create ‘conversations’ with the people looking at them.  I chose significant years in my life and researched what was happening in those years.”
www.abuzzgallery.com

Celebrating the Cowboy with Quilts through March 26 at the Museum of Northwest Colorado in Craig. This exhibit of quilts depicting cowboy culture features work by quilt artist Jean Roesler.
www.museumnwco.org

Tiny Bits and Pieces opening January 30 at the Avenir Museum of Design and Merchandising at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. When the Avenir Museum opens its doors to the public on January 30, it will not only debut a beautiful new space, but will also unveil a unique collection of 116 miniature quilts designed and sewn by College of Health and Human Sciences alumna Lucile Hawks (M.S. home economics, ’58). The exhibition of quilts will feature stunning examples of Hawks’ work.
www.dm.chhs.colostate.edu

 

FLORIDA

FALL 800 Quilt exhibits to visit Winter 2015 2016

Fall Quilt by Eldeen Geist, included in The Sum of Many Parts exhibit and patterned in QN Oct/Nov 2013

The Sum of Many Parts: Quiltmakers in Contemporary America and Mid-Florida Quiltmakers: Commemorations and Connections through January 18 at the Crealdé School of Art in Winter Park. Crealdé is one of the first U.S. hosts for the internationally traveled exhibition “The Sum of Many Parts,” which was originally sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and toured in China before coming to the U.S. QN wrote about “The Sum of Many Parts” and its initial tour of China in our June/July 2013 issue, and published a pattern for one of the quilts, Fall Quilt by Eldeen Geist, in our October/November 2013 issue.
www.crealde.org

 

GEORGIA

Last Words: Quilts by Susan Lenz through December 23 at the Southeastern Quilt & Textile Museum in Carrollton.
www.southeasternquiltmuseum.com

Labor of Love through February at the Male Academy Museum in Newnan. This exhibit features quilts made by Ina Thornton Yates, known to her family as “Big Mom,” who learned to quilt at the age of 8 and wound up making quilts for all of her loved ones from her home in the Arnco mill village.
newnancowetahistoricalsociety.com

 

KENTUCKY

Capturing Women’s History: Quilts, Activism and Storytelling February 1 to March 19 at the University of Louisville’s Hite Art Institute in Louisville. This exhibit will feature the International Honor Quilt, a collaborative feminist art project initiated by artist Judy Chicago that will be displayed in its entirety for the first time, and the Hot Flash Fan, a work that incorporates a mixed-media approach to quilting by 50 Kentucky artists.
www.courier-journal.com

 

MARYLAND

Handmade: Explorations in Fiber Art February 4-27, 2016, at the Black Rock Center for the Arts in Germantown. This is a juried exhibition of contemporary works of fiber art employing traditional and non-traditional materials that are woven or stitched using a wide variety of textile techniques.
www.blackrockcenter.org

 

MASSACHUSETTS

Piecing Together a Changing Planet December 6 to February 7, 2016, at the Boott Cotton Mills Museum in Lowell. This show by more than 20 SAQA members from Florida highlights a few of the many ways that America’s 405 National Parks are being impacted by climate change, water pollution, air pollution and other human-caused phenomena.
www.nps.gov/lowe/

Gloucester: A Community of Neighborhoods in an open-ended exhibit at the Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester. On display in this exhibit are thirteen quilts celebrating Gloucester’s neighborhoods. Working under the leadership of artist Juni Van Dyke, they were designed and created by men and women in the Art Program at Gloucester’s Rose Baker Senior Center.
www.capeannmuseum.org

 

MISSISSIPPI

Ethel Lea Benson: Textiles opening February 12 at Yalo Studio in Water Valley. This exhibit of quilts by local resident Benson (1923-2013) features ones she made of her husband’s denim work clothes as well as a variety of polyester quilts from the 1960s and ’70s. On display will also be photos of Benson and her family, her still-threaded treadle sewing machine and hand-written cotton haul ledgers dating to the 1960s.
www.yalostudio.com

 

NEW JERSEY

Text Messages through March 20 at the Morris Museum in Morristown. For this exhibition, SAQA artists had free rein to explore the many facets of what ‘text messages’ means — from the obvious connection to modern technology to works comprised solely of actual or implied writing. Many quilts featured in the exhibition were inspired by cell phone use, but others depict earlier forms of communication.
www.morrismuseum.org

 

NEW YORK

People & Portraits through December 19 at the Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts in St. Bonaventure. This SAQA exhibition celebrates the expressiveness of the human face. The diverse designs focus on a variety of both emotional states and the ways in which people interact: contemplation, joy, community, work and play.
www.saqa.com

Quilts=Art=Quilts and Traditions Made Modern: Wedding Ring Quilts by Victoria Findlay Wolfe, both through January 3 at the Schweinfurth Art Center in Auburn. Quilts=Art=Quilts in an international juried quilt exhibition featuring quilts by 68 U.S. and international artists. Wolfe made a splash in the quilt world with her best of show win at the first QuiltCon in 2013 for her quilt Double-Edged Love, a modern interpretation of a traditional double wedding ring quilt.
schweinfurthartcenter.org

Quilt: Traditional / Not Traditional through March 9 at the Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery at SUNY Geneseo. This juried, multimedia exhibit clearly illustrates the wide variety of  possibilities for the American quilt.
www.geneseo.edu

 

OKLAHOMA

Charity, Companionship & Comfort through January 30 at the Chisholm Trail Museum in Kingfisher. Nearly 40 historic quilts are displayed in the Seay Mansion and  the meeting room in the museum. Many of them have ties to Oklahoma, including local friendship and fundraising quilts dating from the 1900s to the 1940s.
www.ctokmuseum.org

Quilts and Color from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, through February 7 at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. This exhibit spotlights nearly 50 quilts with bold palettes and inventive designs from the acclaimed Pilgrim/Roy Quilt Collection. Influenced by 20th-century art developments such as abstraction, optical art and the color field movement, Paul Pilgrim and Gerald Roy collected quilts from the late-19th to mid-20th centuries with similarly bold and striking designs.

www.okcmoa.com

 

OREGON

World Painters Challenge through December 24 at the Emerald Art Center in Springfield. This exhibit of 90 art quilt, each 19 inches square, is a re-­creation of a painting — or a portion thereof — by a world-famous artist. Among the more familiar artists whose work has been reinterpreted in quilt form for the the show are Salvador Dali, Marc Chagall, Amadeo Modigliani, Auguste Renoir, Grandma Moses, Paul Cezanne, Édouard Manet, Gustav Klimt, Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol.
registerguard.com

 

PENNSYLVANIA

Stitches: Contemporary Fiber Art Show through January 3 in the Cummings Gallery at Mercyhurst University in Erie. Using the chain stitch as inspiration, Pittsburgh fiber/quilt artist Tina Williams Brewer began a chain bringing together contemporary fiber artists for an exhibition of quilts and fiber art that engage contemporary themes and issues.
miac.mercyhurst.edu

 

TENNESSEE

Patterns of History: Quilts from the Collection through January 31 at the Customs House Museum in Clarksville. This exhibit highlights quilts dating as far back as 1830, including a Mexican Rose quilt (c. 1850–1860) and a Crazy Quilt piano runner (c. 1880) made by Lena McLean of Rutherford County, TN.
customshousemuseum.org

 

TEXAS

Quilts: A World of Beauty – Prizewinners from the International Quilt Association; Selections from SAQA: Wild Fabrications; Modern Quilt Guild at the Texas Quilt Museum; and The Magna Carta Quilts, January 7 to March 27, 2016, at the Texas Quilt Museum in La Grange. The Texas Quilt Museum will kick off its  fifth year with three brand-new exhibits that spotlight the Wild, the Winning, and the Way Modern, as well as a once-in-a-lifetime exhibit of the multi-panel Magna Carta quilt with a historic backstory.
www.texasquiltmuseum.org

 

UTAH

Celebrating Silver through December 31 at the St. George Art Museum. In recognition of SAQA’s 25th anniversary, artists submitted images of current work along with a proposal for how they would interpret the theme “silver.” From a talented pool of entries, SAQA founder Yvonne Porcella selected 35 artists to create work specifically for this exhibition.
www.saqa.com

 

VIRGINIA

Free Admission on November 28 at the Virginia Quilt Museum in Harrisonburg for Shenandoah Valley residents as part of the museum’s 20th Anniversary Community Day.
www.vaquiltmuseum.org

A Celebration of American Quilts through January 3 at the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum in Williamsburg. This exhibition features twelve quilts that represent the diversity of quilts made in American from the 18th through 20th centuries. Several of the quilts are new to the collection and have never before been seen by the public. They represent makers from many regions and ethnic groups, including Anglo-Americans, African Americans, Hawaiians and Amish.
www.colonialwilliamsburg.com

Threaded with Green: Biannual Quilt Show from the Center Street Cotton Collective through February 14 at ArtSpace Herndon in Herndon. The exhibit features the challenge “There Is a Season” from 12 fiber artists who created a quilt for each season: winter, spring, summer and fall. Every quilt in the show has an element of green.
www.artspaceherndon.com

 

WISCONSIN

Lost In Space: Art Quilts by Bruce Seeds through January 11 at the Museum of Wisconsin Art (MOWA) on the Lake in Milwaukee. Bruce Seeds is a contemporary quilt maker whose kaleidoscopic quilts suggest nebulae and galaxies whirling out into the cosmos. He’s used Star Wars fabrics and other novelty prints as the base for his quilts.
www.wisconsinart.org

 

CANADA

Around the Block: Traditional Patterns in the Quilts of Vera Anderson through March 26 at the Old Depot Museum in Ottawa. As a member of the Ottawa Quilter’s Guild, Franklin County resident Anderson made more than 100 quilts and decorations. Anderson’s quilts are contemporary but with older patterns including the Nine-Patch and Triple Irish Chains.
www.ottawaherald.com

 

UNITED KINGDOM

Losing the Compass through January 9 at White Cube, Mason’s Yard in London. This exhibition focuses on the rich symbolism of textiles and their political, social and aesthetic significance through both art and craft practice. It  traces the poetic and subversive use of the textile medium through works by various contemporary artists as well as William Morris, and a series of quilts made collectively by the Amish and Gee’s Bend communities in USA during the late 19th and early 20th Century.
www.roderickkiracofe.com/newsarchive

 

As always, to find out about Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see  Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on  Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

 

 

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So Many Books Giveaway Part 14!

PLEASE NOTE, THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED. CONGRATULATIONS CAROL, CHRIS, and KATHY!

Happy Holidays! Traditions abound during the holiday season, like for Thanksgiving this week here in the United States. A lot of us have made plans to celebrate with our families and friends, cook and/or eat lavish dinners, and shop for the perfect gifts for all our loved ones. If you need any inspiration for gifts for your quilting friends (or yourself), be sure to check out the Holiday Gift Guide for Quilters in Quilters Newsletter‘s December/January 2016 issue. If you’re looking for traditions in quilting, check out the books featured in this week’s giveaway. To enter for your chance to win, scroll down to where it says “Leave a Reply” and tell us what crazy feature would you like invented for the next new sewing machine and which of the prizes you would most prefer to win if you have a preference (full rules below):

IMG 9123 So Many Books Giveaway Part 14!Prize 1 includes Country Elegance by Leonie Bateman and Deirdre Bond-Abel for That Patchwork Place, Preserving Our Quilt Legacy by Ann Wasserman, Amish Quilts: The Adventure Continues edited by Lynn Koolish for C&T Publishing, and Homestyle Quilts: Simple Patterns and Savory Recipes by Kim Diehl and Laurie Baker for That Patchwork Place.

IMG 9127 So Many Books Giveaway Part 14!Prize 2 includes Comfort and Devotion: A Quilting Tribute to Nurses of the Civil War by Sarah Maxwell and Dolores Smith for Kansas City Star Books, Civil War Legacies II by Carol Hopkins for That Patchwork Place, The Blue and the Gray by Mary Etherington and Connie Tesene for That Patchwork Place, and She Came From Kansas by Sandy Humphreys and Sue Horton for Kansas City Star Books.

IMG 9128 So Many Books Giveaway Part 14!Prize 3 includes Pennsylvania Patchwork Pillowcases by Ann R. Hermes for Schiffer Publishing, Creating Heirlooms One Stitch at a Time by Carolyn Konig for QUILTmania Editions, Quilting-on-the-Go: Taking It Further by Carolyn Forster for Landauer Publishing, and Then and Now Quilts by Joyce Dean Gieszler for Kansas City Star Books.

To enter for your chance to win one of the three sets of books, leave a comment on this post by 11:59 pm Mountain Time, Sunday November 29, 2015 telling us what crazy feature would you like invented for the next new sewing machine. If you have a preference between the prizes, let us know that in your comment as well. Since winners are randomly selected, we don’t guarantee you’ll win your preferred prize if chosen, but we’ll do our best! Open to anyone worldwide who has not won anything from Quilters Newsletter in the past 90 days. If you are randomly selected as a winner, the email will come from QNMquestions@fwmedia.com with “Quilters Newsletter blog giveaway” in the subject line.

To find out about more giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and to see all the beautiful quilts we like to share, join us on FacebookTwitter, Google+, Pinterest, InstagramYouTube and our website. Plus, see Web Seminars on QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Caitlin, Contests | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 179 Comments

Piecing a Back for the Churn Dash Quilt

I’ve talked before about my churn dash quilt. I started it in September then put it away for a bit and now I’m ready to finish it. The top is completed except for borders. You can see it in my blog post here.

Now that Quilt Market is over, I would like to finish that quilt, so I started working on the back. I have nine extra churn dash blocks, all with the blue background. I also have a few orphan blocks that are the right colors and a stack of blue 8½” string-pieced squares. But that isn’t nearly enough for the back of a quilt so I’m going to have to make something more.

onthewall1 Piecing a Back for the Churn Dash Quilt

This is the starting point for the quilt back.

I really like to do string piecing but I wanted to try something fancier than just squares. I decided to make “fabric” out of string piecing for a huge churn dash block.

First, I did a drawing on graph paper and figured a little math. I wanted my big block to finish at 39”.

pattern Piecing a Back for the Churn Dash Quilt

The Preliminary Math

Then I string pieced my squares and rectangles. I cut my paper for the foundation several inches larger than it needed to be so I had a margin for error.

stringsquare Piecing a Back for the Churn Dash Quilt

String-pieced Square

I trimmed the string-pieced fabric to size and hung the parts on my design wall. I found enough ivory tone-on-tone for the background and sewed the parts together.

onthewall2 Piecing a Back for the Churn Dash Quilt

The Churn Dash Big Block – Ready to Stitch Together

I took the big block and some of the other parts for the quilt back to work with me so I’d have better light to photograph and that’s when I started having doubts.

ohoh Piecing a Back for the Churn Dash Quilt

The Completed Big Block with Other Bits and Pieces

When I talk and teach about making pieced backs, I often warn that sometimes you wind up with something too “good” to put on the back of a quilt. That’s how I’m feeling about this. I think my huge churn dash block needs to be part of the front of a quilt. So now I’m wondering if I need to use string-pieced blocks for the rest of that new quilt, if I want to make three more churn dash blocks or if I just want to use the one with a bunch of ivory tone-on-tone or low-volume fabric for a modern quilt. Or maybe someone out there has an idea of how to use my big churn dash block.

Those decisions are the fun part.

The not-so-fun part is that I still don’t have a back for my churn dash quilt. But I smile when I write that.

And just in case you want to make your own churn dash quilt, I found a digital pattern at QuiltandSewShop.com for a throw featuring a churn dash within a star block.

And remember, to find out about Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and more classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Inspiration, Lori Baker, Staff Quilts | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Scrap Bag: Luke Haynes interview, quilt gardens, fabric-choosing tips and more

It’s a rather mixed bag of quilt- and textile-related news items I wanted to share this week, much like the photo of scraps below. But that just means there’s pretty much something for everyone — take your pick!

IMG 1939 Scrap Bag: Luke Haynes interview, quilt gardens, fabric choosing tips and more

Luke Haynes’ star has been steadily rising for a few years now. QN published a feature article on him in our February/March 2010 issue, and I was fortunate to interview Luke for Quilters Newsletter TV: The Quilters’ Community in 2014, which you can preview in the video below. (Go to QNNtv.com to view the full episode of my interview with Luke, as well as to watch his longarm quilting demonstration episode.)

Luke recently taped an hour-long episode of the While She Naps podcast, in which he and host Abby Glassenberg talk about quilts as fine art and the many issues surrounding building a career as a contemporary quilt artist.
whileshenaps.com

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Emily Lynch’s paintings are striking visual representations of math, drawing on mathematical concepts to create complex systems of patterns in her work. And because they’re based on patterns, they look to me like they’re just begging to be made into quilts. Click the link to watch a five-minute video showing Emily at work, both at her day job as a math educator and when she’s creating her paintings — I love the part where she lets a deck of playing cards determine color placement and just might have to adopt that approach for a future project. Watching her work made me wonder how many quilters of the past could have been brilliant mathematicians but whose only permissible outlet for their natural talents was through “women’s work” like the needle arts. More than we’ll ever know, I think.
www.pbs.org

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GARDENS 800 Scrap Bag: Luke Haynes interview, quilt gardens, fabric choosing tips and more

Vera Bradley-inspired garden from the 2010 Quilt Gardens … Along the Heritage Trail in Indiana, as seen in the April/May 2013 issue of QN (Photo credit: Elkhart County, IN, CVB)

Even though we’ve barely entered into the 2015 winter holiday season, some of you may already be planning your 2016 garden. If so, you’ll want to read this article from Lancaster Online that highlights both the annual Quilt Gardens in Elkhart, Indiana, as well the North Carolina Arboretum’s Quilt Garden.
lancasteronline.com

You can read more about “Quilt Gardens … Along the Heritage Trail” by ZJ Humbach in the April/May 2013 issue of QN.

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We frequently include news and feature articles about the International Quilt Study Center & Museum at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in QN. At about 500 miles from Denver, however, it’s too far for a convenient day trip so I have yet to visit it in person, as much as I’d love to. Quilting teacher Chris Lynn Kirsch was recently in Lincoln at the invitation of a local guild and blogged about her first visit to IQSCM. It’s a nice virtual tour for those of us who haven’t been there.
chrisquilts.net

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23048455302 cf035627e1 o Scrap Bag: Luke Haynes interview, quilt gardens, fabric choosing tips and more

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg’s representation of the three-sided color graph developed by the astronomer and mapmaker Tobias Mayer

Looking for some inspiration for a color wheel quilt design? How about a color triangle quilt design? Or even a color sphere? The Public Domain Review website published “a chronology of various attempts through the last four centuries to visually organise and make sense of colour. A wide variety of forms and methods are represented: from simple wheels to multi-layered pyramids, from scientific systems to those based on the hues of human emotion.” These beautiful designs will have you looking at — and potentially using — color in a whole new way.
publicdomainreview.org

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Fabric Tips Tip Tuesday 1 Scrap Bag: Luke Haynes interview, quilt gardens, fabric choosing tips and more

Speaking of color, how do you choose fabric for your quilts? Our sister publication Fons & Porter’s Love of Quilting posted “Cotton? Print? Flannel? Quilting Fabric Choices… how do you make them?” on their blog and asked six editors and artists from different quilt magazines to weigh in the question, including yours truly.
www.fonsandporter.com/blogs/

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Those with an interest in textile and fashion history will want to try to visit the Fashion and Virtue: Textile Patterns and the Print Revolution, 1520–1620 exhibit at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City before January 10, 2016. This interdisciplinary exhibition, drawn largely from the Metropolitan Museum’s own collection, combines printed pattern books, drawings, textile samples, costumes, paintings, and various other works of art to evoke the colorful world in which the Renaissance textile pattern books first emerged and functioned. Vogue.com published a short article about it that goes into a little more detail about how the exhibit incorporates 20th-century fashion inspired by centuries-old patterns.
www.metmuseum.org

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QN11215 221x300 Scrap Bag: Luke Haynes interview, quilt gardens, fabric choosing tips and moreJust in case you don’t already have your copy, the December/January 2016 issue of Quilters Newsletter is available now in quilt shops, bookstores and on newsstands; it’s also available in both print and digital editions from QuiltandSewShop.com.

This issue is full of great content, starting with our cover quilt, Celebrating My INFJ by Judy Heyward. An INFJ personality (according to Meyers-Briggs) exhibits Introversion, iNtuition, Feeling and Judging as  dominant traits. Judy says making this quilt helped her come to terms to with being in the sensitive minority, something that had bugged her before. Pick up your copy of the December/January 2016 issue to read more about her inspiration, process and techniques, and to see close-up photos of the details on this exquisite quilt.

As always, to find out about Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see  Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on  Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Mary Kate Karr-Petras | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Skylines, Colorful Fabric and FMQ

PLEASE NOTE, THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED. CONGRATULATIONS ELAINE and SUSAN!

If you’ve been reading the giveaways on the QN blog for a while, it probably won’t come as a surprise that I love when a new issue of Quilters Newsletter, QN11215 221x300 Skylines, Colorful Fabric and FMQ like the brand new December/January 2016 issue which officially went on sale yesterday, comes out. The culmination of the entire process including picking the quilts to pattern and articles to feature, writing those patterns and articles, and going through all the stages of editing to be as certain as possible that every detail is correct all boils down to the moment when we first get that shiny new copy in our hands. It’s a bit like that moment when you’ve finished the binding on a quilt (and put the label on if you’ve saved that step for last) and you now have the finished project to show for all your efforts. If you don’t already have your copy of Quilters Newsletter‘s December/January 2016 issue, you can get one at your local bookstore, quilt shop, newsstand, or online at Quilt and Sew Shop in print or digital formats.

One of the best parts of every new QN issue is the Staff Picks section, and the fabric collection and both books featured in this week’s giveaway are December/January 2016 Staff Picks. Prize 1 this week includes a bundle of fat quarters from the Skylines collection and coordinating Watercolor Palette tone-on-tones by Hoffman Fabrics and a copy of Colorful Fabric Collage: Sketch, Fuse, Quilt! by Sue Bleiweiss from Interweave: Skylines 2 Skylines, Colorful Fabric and FMQ

Prize 2 includes a bundle of fat quarters from the Skylines collection and Watercolor Palette tone-on-tones by Hoffman Fabrics and a copy of Step-by-Step Free-Motion Quilting by Christina Cameli from Stash Books: Skylines 1 Skylines, Colorful Fabric and FMQ

To enter for your chance to win one of the two fabric bundles with one of the two books, leave a comment on this post by 11:59 pm Mountain Time, Sunday November 22, 2015, telling us about a project you’ve finished recently, whether quilting or otherwise. If you have a preference between the prizes, let us know that in your comment as well. Since winners are randomly selected, we don’t guarantee you’ll win your preferred prize if chosen, but we’ll do our best! Open to anyone worldwide who has not won anything from Quilters Newsletter in the past 90 days. If you are randomly selected as a winner, the email will come from QNMquestions@fwmedia.com with “Quilters Newsletter blog giveaway” in the subject line.

To find out about more giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and to see all the beautiful quilts we like to share, join us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube and our website. Plus, see Web Seminars on QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Caitlin, Contests | Tagged , , , , , , | 281 Comments

My Vintage Sewing Machines

I don’t remember much about the sewing machine I used when I first started sewing.  I’m guessing that I was about 10 years old. It was my first year of 4-H. I do remember that Mom had a really nice sewing machine for the time. It had plastic cams so it could make decorative stitches. I think it was a Necchi. I’ll have to remember to ask Mom the next time we visit.

The next machine I used was an old Singer loaned to me by my hubby’s grandmother. I don’t remember much about that machine.

Then in 1970 or so, my dad bought me a brand new machine, a Necchi 534FB.  I loved that machine and I sewed for miles and miles. It had nine decorative stitches, it made decent buttonholes and it was a workhorse. I loved that machine so much that when my daughter got married in 1980, I found a used 10-year-old Necchi 534FB, and bought it for her.  And I found one for sale online just the other day and I was truly tempted.

I love older machines and I’d like to show you mine. I don’t exactly have a collection but I do have more than the average person.

I purchased my first old machine at an auction for $5. I just couldn’t stand for that lovely old machine to go to the junk pile. It’s in a cabinet that is pretty beat up but it still sews. According to the serial numbers on the Singer website, it was manufactured in 1949.  It sews straight stitches only.

Singer1 My Vintage Sewing Machines

Singer #1

When I started working in the sewing industry selling sewing machines, I kept hearing about the Pfaff 130 that was introduced in 1932. It has a straight stitch, it zigzags, it does a few special stitches. I found one online and it became “old machine #2.” It’s portable but it weighs a bunch. Manufactured in 1954, it also still sews.

Pfaff130 My Vintage Sewing Machines

My Pfaff 130

Then one day, one of my sons came with a present he’d found for me at a garage sale. This old Singer doesn’t have a power cord or a foot control so he got it for a song. It is portable and was manufactured in 1927. I researched and found an estimated cost of between $60 and  $70 new. I don’t know if it sews but isn’t it beautiful?

Singer2 My Vintage Sewing Machines

Singer #2

That same son found another old machine at a sale. It’s in a cabinet. It’s missing parts so again; I don’t know if it sews. It’s a New Home model NLB and was manufactured sometime after 1944.

NewHome My Vintage Sewing Machines

My New Home Sewing Machine

I got to thinking about what a quilter needs in a sewing machine. Any of these machines would work for a quilter as far as I am concerned. I could get a power cord and a foot control for the two that are missing parts and we could have a regular sewing bee at my house and I could provide the machines. As quilters, all that is necessary is a good quality straight stitch. However, I’ll be the first to admit that I want a whole lot more. I want needle down, automatic presser foot lift, a walking foot, moveable needle position, a ¼” foot and a bi-level topstitch foot and the ability to drop the feed dogs. Those are just the things I want with the straight stitch. And I truly love the brighter lights and the large sewing area on today’s machines.

I hope you’ve enjoyed a peek at my older machines. As I was musing about these old machines and their capabilities, I thought of a new technique that they are capable of. Check out the webinar about Peg Spradlin’s innovative Fold and Sew technique. It’s quick, it’s easy and it uses pre-cuts (or if you have a large amount of scraps you can cut your own). Check it out.

And until next time, to find out about giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and to see all the beautiful quilts we like to share, join us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see other Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and more classes, courses and workshops on  Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

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Scrap Bag: Libby Lehman sews, machine quilting in the 1880s, and more

It’s that time — time to reach into our stash of little quilty news items to see what larger stories you can work them into. (Click the links to read more and to see photos.)

IMG 8809 1024x798 Scrap Bag: Libby Lehman sews, machine quilting in the 1880s, and more

Coordinated vintage feedsack scraps — what could be cheerier?

Let’s start off with your feel-good video for the day: Libby Lehman’s back! Stroke victim Libby Lehman is on the road to recovery and is back in her studio for the first time in 2-1/2 years. Watch her create an art quilt with friend Ricky Tims by her side that they call Courage and Kindness, inspired by the recent live-action film version of “Cinderella.” She may be slower in movement and speech than she was before her stroke, but her optimism and sense of humor seem undiminished. And in a testament to the power of muscle memory, her free-motion stitching is still a million times better than mine.

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Artist, activist, quilter and fabric designer Melanie Testa recently blogged about getting back into a creative groove and what she learned about herself during the drought.
melanietesta.com

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A small group of women have been getting together weekly for the past couple of months at the Richfield Senior Center in Ohio to practice quilting by hand. “It’s an informal gathering of quilters who want to learn more and be together,” said the center’s director. “It’s a resurgence, I’m hoping.”
www.akron.com

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Lest we all think that hand quilting was the only acceptable way to finish a quilt until about 30 years ago, take a look at the front page of the February 27, 1886, edition of the Southern Standard. Under the heading “A Useful Invention” you can read what is essentially a press release describing the Fraley’s Quilting Frame.

usefulitem18861 674x1024 Scrap Bag: Libby Lehman sews, machine quilting in the 1880s, and more

News item from the February 27, 1886, edition of the Southern Standard

Machine quilting on a frame — popular since the 19th century!

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Because fabric used for garments frequently found its way into quilts in days past, Fashion Victims: The Dangers of Dress Past and Present by Allison Matthews David may be of interest to quilt history buffs, particularly those with a high tolerance for the morbid and somewhat disturbing. According to the publisher, “Clothing is designed to protect, shield and comfort us, yet lurking amongst seemingly innocuous garments we find hats laced with mercury, frocks laden with arsenic and literally ‘drop-dead gorgeous’ gowns.” Now I need to research quilts that might have been made with arsenic-laden fabric.
www.bloomsbury.com

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Much as we think of our pioneer forebears preparing for cold weather, quiltmaking is serious business in northern Bangladesh as winter approaches. According to the Daily Star, there are about 700 quiltmakers in the Nilphamari district working to meet current demand by each making five to six bed-size quilts per day — yes, you read that right. Based on the current exchange rate for the Bangladeshi taka at $.013, it means that the quilts sell for about $15.50 to $19.25 each. Click the link below to see a photo of a man stitching a quilt at his outdoor roadside shop, working from the outside edges toward the center.
www.thedailystar.net

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The Belfast Telegraph recently reported that the Tower Museum in Derry, Northern Ireland, will be home to a new website charting the development of an international collection of over 270 textile pieces that depict conflict situations around the world. Conflict Textiles began in an exhibition entitled “The Art Of Survival: International And Irish Quilts,” which was held at nine venues across Derry in early 2008. This exhibition also featured Chilean arpilleras, three-dimensional textiles that originated during General Augusto Pinochet’s reign of oppression (read QN’s June/July 2015 issue to learn more about arpilleras).
www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk

QASS LUCK10 640 Scrap Bag: Libby Lehman sews, machine quilting in the 1880s, and more

Quilt and Sew Shop is holding a two-day promotion that lets you take $10 off an order of $35 or more if you use promo code LUCK10 at checkout. Visit QuiltandSewShop.com by November 14 to see all of the great deals already in place — the Fall Clearance sale is still in effect with savings up to 60% on over 100 items, including kits, fabric bundles and yardage.

As always, to find out about Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see  Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on  Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Mary Kate Karr-Petras | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Celebrating Our Veterans with Quilts

PLEASE NOTE, THIS GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED. THANK YOU TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED. CONGRATULATIONS SHERRY AND TERI!

Happy Veterans Day! November 11, 1918 was the general end of the war to end all wars,” World War I, and while wars are still ongoing around the world, the day to reflect on what American President Wilson stated in November 1919 as a “solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service” is still celebrated each November 11 (despite a brief change in official date from 1971-1978).

DPQNP1575 Celebrating Our Veterans with Quilts

Ooh-Rah by Lori Baker, designed in honor of veterans.

As Memorial Day (originally known as Decoration Day) became a day of remembering those who died in service in any war (not just the Civil War), Veterans Day also became a day of showing our gratitude to our surviving veterans, and one of the ways we quilters like to show our gratitude is by gifting and donating quilts to our veterans. This week’s giveaway here on the QN blog consists of two fabric bundles perfect for making a quilt to be gifted or donated to a veteran, one from the Liberty for All collection from Connecting Threads, and one from the One Nation collection by P&B Textiles.

Prize 1 is a fat quarter bundle from the Liberty for All collection by Winthur Sempliner from Connecting Threads. Connecting Threads Liberty for All 3 Celebrating Our Veterans with Quilts

Prize 2 is a fat quarter bundle from the One Nation collection by P&B Textiles. PB Textiles One Nation Celebrating Our Veterans with Quilts

To enter for your chance to win one of these two patriotic fat quarter bundles, leave a comment on this post by 11:59 pm Mountain Time, Sunday November 15, 2015 telling us what freedoms you’re thankful for this Veteran’s Day. If you have a preference between the prizes, let us know that in your comment as well. Since winners are randomly selected, we don’t guarantee you’ll win your preferred prize if chosen, but we’ll do our best! Open to anyone worldwide who has not won anything from Quilters Newsletter in the past 90 days. If you are randomly selected as a winner, the email will come from QNMquestions@fwmedia.com with “Quilters Newsletter blog giveaway” in the subject line.

To find out about more giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and to see all the beautiful quilts we like to share, join us on FacebookTwitter, Google+, Pinterest, InstagramYouTube and our website. Plus, see Web Seminars on QuiltAndSewShop.com and classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

Posted in Caitlin, Contests | Tagged , , , , , , , | 64 Comments

One More Look at Quilt Market

As I look through the photos I took at Quilt Market, I’m so glad that I didn’t have to judge the quilts. I have dozens and dozens of photos of quilts that weren’t prizewinners but were totally wonderful. How in the world do the judges choose which to award a prize and which to just admire?

Here are a few more photos.

Luke One More Look at Quilt Market

LUKE by LUKE Haynes of Los Angeles, California

From across the room, I recognized this quilt as LUKE Haynes. Notice the dozens and dozens of flying geese in the background and in the name. The quilt was made using repurposed fabric and clothing from thrift stores.

TwinklingStars One More Look at Quilt Market

Twinkling Stars by Maya Chaimovich of Ramat Gan, Israel

Chaimovich said her original design is from the memory of the night skies seen in an off-road Jeep trip to the Rubicon Trail in California.

SilentAuction2 One More Look at Quilt Market

Silent Auction Quilts

SilentAuction1 One More Look at Quilt Market

More Silent Auction Quilts

These are just a few of the quilts donated to the International Quilt Association for their annual silent auction.

Magnolia One More Look at Quilt Market

Magnolia by Fusako Takido of Shizuoka-shi Shizuoka-ken, Japan

Takido said, “Dandelions are blooming, even though they are stepped on. Magnolias are elegantly blooming over the dandelions. Spring flowers make my heart brighten up.” The quilt includes hand piecing, applique, embroidery, trapunto and quilting.

RandomPerfection One More Look at Quilt Market

Random Perfection by Wanda Dotson of Glen Allen, Virginia

Dotson’s inspiration came from the song “Over the Rainbow.” She said she appliqued the hexagons by machine and when she washed it about 1/3 of the edges came off. She took off those hexagons and named it Random Perfection.

Embers One More Look at Quilt Market

Embers by Stephanie Ruyle of Denver, Colorado

Ruyle used  “a special glass nano particle fabric that is 100% retroflective.” That fabric looked metallic gray when I was viewing the quilt but when I took a flash photo the fabric caught the flash and look what happened.

tammy One More Look at Quilt Market

Tammy Silvers in her booth

Market is also a great place to touch base with sewing/quilting friends and quilt designers like Tammy Silvers.

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Kim and Her Wonderful Skirt

And speaking of sewing friends, Kim Niedzwiecki, creative director for Aurifil, made this beautiful skirt with Moda Zen Chic fabrics. She pieced it with Aurifil 50wt thread and constructed the skirt with Aurifil 40wt thread. I fell in love with her pretty, pretty skirt. Her son, Michael, is the talented photographer.

QM150803 One More Look at Quilt Market

Log Cabin Quilt Kit

And I just checked in at QuiltandSewShop.com and found a great sale going on. I was looking for a log cabin quilt and found this pretty quilt kit, and it’s marked down from $134.99 to $107.99.

But then, because I’m a shopper, I wanted to see what else was available and there are 185 items on the sale and clearance pages. Check them out.

And remember, to find out about Quilters Newsletter’s giveaways, quilting news, tips, techniques and more, visit us on Facebook,  Twitter,  Google+,  Pinterest,  Instagram,  YouTube,   QNNtv.com and our website. Plus, see Web Seminars on  QuiltAndSewShop.com and more classes, courses and workshops on Craft Daily.com and  CraftOnlineUniversity.com.

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